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SUPERTRAMP

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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Supertramp picture
Supertramp biography
Formed in 1969 in London, England - Disbanded in 1988 - Reunited intermittently from 1996 to 2002 - Reformed in 2010/11 for European tour

A variant of progressive rock that some have called sophisto-rock. SUPERTRAMP is a sophisticated pop band that was able to continuously turn out very good songs. Their music has been described as whimsy, lighthearted, fluff and a million other variations on this theme. This music is the kind of thing that you will put on while you and your wife lounging around after dinner. Mellow and very good. One other thing is that they also have the ability to inject some humor into their music now and then. Althogh most of the songs on the album are rock radio staples. This is something that is hard to find.

For some of their best work you will have to look elsewhere. They had a remarkable change in fortune as "Crime of the Century" became one of the top-selling albums of 1974. The band had refined their keyboard-dominated sound and produced an album that was well-reviewed. The album "Even In The Quietest Moments..." is by far their best work. With over 18 million copies to date, "Breakfast In America" is one of the greatest melodic pop/rock albums of the seventies. After that album, SUPERTRAMP continued to develop a more R&B-flavored style; the change in direction was successful on 1982's "Famous Last Words", but they soon ran out of hits. SUPERTRAMP continued with occasional tours and infrequent albums. Their recent releases, however, have only found minor success.

See also: Roger HODGSON

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SUPERTRAMP discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

SUPERTRAMP top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.47 | 340 ratings
Supertramp
1970
2.67 | 252 ratings
Indelibly Stamped
1971
4.31 | 1660 ratings
Crime of the Century
1974
3.59 | 483 ratings
Crisis? What Crisis?
1975
3.98 | 615 ratings
Even In The Quietest Moments ...
1977
3.95 | 751 ratings
Breakfast In America
1979
3.20 | 337 ratings
Famous Last Words
1982
3.66 | 335 ratings
Brother Where You Bound
1985
1.84 | 195 ratings
Free As A Bird
1987
3.00 | 164 ratings
Some Things Never Change
1997
2.91 | 143 ratings
Slow Motion
2002

SUPERTRAMP Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.64 | 192 ratings
Paris
1980
2.34 | 28 ratings
Supertramp Live '88
1988
3.38 | 43 ratings
It Was The Best Of Times
1999
3.95 | 27 ratings
Is Everybody Listening?
2001
4.08 | 3 ratings
Alive in America
2014

SUPERTRAMP Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

2.60 | 22 ratings
The Story So Far...
1991
3.06 | 12 ratings
Inside Supertramp 1974-1978
2004
4.02 | 11 ratings
Gateway To New Horizons
2010
4.45 | 55 ratings
Live in Paris 1979
2012

SUPERTRAMP Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.58 | 25 ratings
The Autobiography of Supertramp
1987
2.09 | 10 ratings
Classics, Vol. 9
1987
3.42 | 36 ratings
The Very Best Of Supertramp
1990
3.07 | 25 ratings
The Very Best Of Supertramp - Volume 2
1992
3.31 | 35 ratings
Retrospectable - The Supertramp Anthology
2005

SUPERTRAMP Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.00 | 1 ratings
Your Poppa Don't Mind / Rosie Had Everything Planned
1971
2.78 | 10 ratings
Dreamer / Bloody Well Right
1974
2.72 | 11 ratings
Land Ho / Summer Romance
1974
3.00 | 4 ratings
Lady / You Started Laughing When I Held You In My Arms
1975
3.91 | 2 ratings
Ain't Nobody but Me / Sister Moonshine
1975
4.00 | 1 ratings
Give a Little Bit
1977
0.00 | 0 ratings
Babaji
1977
3.08 | 3 ratings
Goodbye Stranger
1979
3.00 | 3 ratings
The Logical Song
1979
3.19 | 7 ratings
Breakfast in America / Gone Hollywood
1979
3.33 | 3 ratings
Take the Long Way Home / From Now On
1979
3.09 | 4 ratings
It's Raining Again / Bonnie
1982
3.90 | 2 ratings
Don't Leave Me Now / Waiting So Long
1982
0.00 | 0 ratings
Still In Love / No Inbetween
1985

SUPERTRAMP Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Supertramp by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.47 | 340 ratings

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Supertramp
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Umeda

4 stars Even though being overlooked the way it is, mainly because it wasn't realeased in the US until 7 years after its release, this is in my opinion, a very satisfying beginning for Supertramp, considering the band is labeled under the progressive rock genre. They were still trying to find their sound, here. And they have done it in a very good surprising way. This album features well constructed pieces of music, such as "Words Unspoken" with its melancholic feeling and "Maybe I'm A Beggar", with a well fitted flageolet introduction and a screaming guitars section. Oh by the way, this album has plenty of flageolet sections that fit really well with the darker atmosphere of the album. Of course, they still weren't as confident as they would be in the production of their more successful albums, and the lack of Davies vocals is also a weak spot of this album, which is a mark of the typical Supertramp album. Still, this album is very worth taking a try, especially for hardline symphonic prog fans and rather pretty interesting for the fans.
 The Logical Song by SUPERTRAMP album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1979
3.00 | 3 ratings

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The Logical Song
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

3 stars On face A, "The Logical Song" is a slightly shortened edit from the track in the blockbuster album "Breakfast in America". It sounds to me like some a bit more energic take on the McCartney's "Fool On The Hill" theme of the individual alienated from society because of his unconventional (or non-logical) way of thinking. Great vocal interpretation by Roger Hogdson, that simple but personal electric piano emerging to the fore of the collective pop consciousness, and the sax solo, so dated, but still, always lovely.

And on the B side, tell me people, with an album almost full of so good songs, couldn't they find anything better for the flip?

 Goodbye Stranger by SUPERTRAMP album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1979
3.08 | 3 ratings

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Goodbye Stranger
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

3 stars Nice pairing the one that we are considering.

I have to say that the greatest progressive value is in the side B to be found. "Even in the Quietest Moments", taken from the eponymous 1977 album, presents marvellous natural ambiance in the beginning, great twelve string acoustic guitar arpeggios preparing for the melody sung by Roger Hodgson, and gorgeous touches by John Anthony Helliwell on clarinet.

"Goodbye Stranger", coming from Supertramp's 1979 album "Breakfast in America", is a good light-hearted pop song sung by Rick Davies, with a catchy chorus in falsetto. Pay attention to the nice electric guitar duty reaching the end.

 Ain't Nobody but Me / Sister Moonshine by SUPERTRAMP album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1975
3.91 | 2 ratings

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Ain't Nobody but Me / Sister Moonshine
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

4 stars A fine coupling coming from ""Crisis... What crisis?, fourth album by the English band Supertramp, released also in 1975

On the A face, we have "Ain't Nobody But Me", a mid-tempo slightly bluesy tune sung by Rick Davies, and significatively augmented with impecable big-band like saxophones by John Anthony Helliwell. Edited from the original album track, which is aproximately one minute longer

Inexplicably on the flip side, shines "Sister Moonshine" with vocals and acoustic guitar (nice slide touches too) by Roger Hodgson. A highly accomplished folk tune, wrapped in a trippy ambiance suggested by the vocal harmonies and the mellotron subtle incursions.

 Crisis? What Crisis? by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.59 | 483 ratings

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Crisis? What Crisis?
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars "Crisis" is indeed far from any Supertramp crisis; it marks development in the band's sound, writing style. I think that songs are more radio friendly but that does not mean that the band were resting on their laurels. I can hear country influences, the sound of harmonica, early funk elements - you wouldn't find this on the previous album.

The songs are mainly melodic, accessible and very soft occasional traces of progressive rock are minimized. The band shows actually that it can rock, too - listen to the slow grooving rock'n'roll of "Ain't nobody but me". "A soapbox opera" is a pleasant melodic a bit poignant violin decorated number, a hidden pop champion. "Another man's woman" is the only so-so song with more complexity - piano lines, different sections and rhythm, nice instrumental section with multiple instruments - something like rock/orchestra opera. "Lady" has a clear commercial melody grooves but the ending instrumental loose part saves it a bit. "Just a normal day" is an impressive balad with some ancient chord sequences that remind me of the 20-30's. "Two of us" is another ballad, even more smoothing and it will blend in your ears. A good but non-essential piece of rock.

 Crime of the Century by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.31 | 1660 ratings

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Crime of the Century
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars Crime of the century is a trademark album by Supertramp, it has a very good sound, good lighthearted composition, a few progressive rock touches and fortunately, enough instrumental moments. The music isn't adventurous but is varied enough thanks to a number of instruments like saxophone and a good set of keyboards. Most of the time though it has pop-rock tendencies and is pretty accessible. Note influences by Pink Floyd and Elton John. I won't be talking about the two most poppy tracks with typical electric piano sound for Supertramp. There is a groove, nice saxophone and user friendliness - "Hide in your shell" and "Dreamer". My favourite piece is "Asylum" thanks to its elaborate arrangements and very good moog/synths colours. The melody is quite solemn, the voice by "Davies" is less poppy than by Hodgson. "Rudy" is another track well worth exploring - semi-progressive rhythm with irregular motives, great piano, epic piano/synths/orchestra sound evoking Elton John of the this era. "Crime of the century" is a nice title anthemic track. Overall, it is a mellow easy-going album that will please fans of good melodies, compositions and arrangements without much complexity but enough sophistication to stay popular for a long time.
 Indelibly Stamped by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1971
2.67 | 252 ratings

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Indelibly Stamped
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N?362

'Indelibly Stamped' is the second studio album of Supertramp and was released in 1971. Like their eponymous debut studio album, 'Indelibly Stamped' was also a commercial disappointment, which resulted in the loss of their sponsor and the dissolution of the band at that moment. Musically, this was the most rock and roll of all their albums and it's also usually considered the weakest musical work made by the group while Roger Hodgson was a band's member.

The art cover of the album depicts a photo of an image of the torso and arms of a topless woman with several multiple tattoos. The original edition brings the cover photo in colours, but my CD version has a black and white cover, indeed.

With the abandonment of the group by Richard Palmer-James and Robert Millar, three new band's members Kevin Currie, Frank Farrell and Dave Winthrop were recruited shortly before the recording sessions of 'Indelibly Stamped'.

So, the line up on the album is Roger Hodgson (vocals, acoustic and electric guitars and bass), Rick Davies (vocals, harmonica and keyboards), Dave Winthrop (vocals, flute and saxophone), Frank Farrell (backing vocals, piano, electric piano, accordion and bass) and Kevin Currie (drums and percussion).

'Indelibly Stamped' has ten tracks. All songs were written by Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies, except 'Rosie Had Everything Planned' which was written by Roger Hodgson and Frank Farrell. The first track 'Your Poppa Don't Mind' is sung by Rick Davies and is influenced by the blues. It's an interesting song to open the album with a catchy rhythm and the final result is nice to hear. The second track 'Travelled' is sung by Roger Hodgson and is basically an acoustic song, especially in the beginning. It's a song with a very simple structure, very nice to hear and with also an interesting repetitive saxophone work on its finale. The third track 'Rosie Had Everything Planned' is sung by Roger Hodgson. It's a different song relatively to the two previous songs. This is a nice and calm song made in the vein of a folk song, and like the other two, it's also nice to hear. It's a melancholic song, probably the main thing that has a real appealing effect on me. The fourth track 'Remember' is sung by Rick Davies. It's a good rock song and it has a nice saxophone work all over the song. This is a song that moves between the influences of blues and jazz. It's interesting that, while we hear the song, we have the sensation that it was recorded at the maximum volume. The fifth track 'Forever' is sung by Rick Davies. It's another interesting song, this time totally influenced by the blues. It's interesting to note some similitude between 'Remember' and 'Forever'. I think we can see here the future musical direction of the next songs composed by Rick Davies on the future works of the band. The sixth track 'Potter' is sung by Dave Winthrop. This is an interesting and curious fact, because from what I can remember, this is the only track in the entire career of the band that was not sung by Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies. It's a nice and a catchy simple rock song, very short, as many songs on the album. But, it has nothing to do with the future Supertramp's sound. The seventh track 'Coming Home To See You' is sung by Rick Davies. This is one of the most interesting songs on the album. It's a song with fine instrumental sections where we can hear the different music instruments performed by all band's members as lead instruments. This is one of the songs on the album where we can hear what would become their signature sound. The eighth track 'Times Have Changed' is sung by Rick Davies and represents also one of the finest moments on the album. We may say this is a typical song of Rick Davies, and like the previous song 'Coming Home To See You', this is another song on the album where we can hear what would become their future sound. The ninth track 'Friend In Need' is sung by Rick Davies and is the smallest song on the album. However and despite be also a good and nice song it's, for me, clearly inferior to the most of the songs on the album composed by Rick Davies, and in the end, it doesn't remains in our memory. The tenth track 'Aries' is sung by Roger Hodgson. It's the lengthiest song on the album and it's the only song with a notable lengthy. This is a quite different song on the album and it's also, without any doubt, the best and most progressive song on the album. It's a song with many similarities with songs of some other bands, in those times, such as The Doors, and particularly, it reminds me very strongly some songs of the early days of Strawbs.

Conclusion: Although 'Indelibly Stamped' be inferior and less progressive than their eponymous debut studio album 'Supertramp', and it's also very far away from be as good as their studio albums that belonging to their golden musical era, it's, in my humble opinion, a good album that deserves to be rated with 3 stars. However, it's also, without any doubt, the weakest studio album released by the group while Roger Hodgson was a band's member. Anyway, if you're a Supertramp's fan, even moderately, you might very well find something quite enjoyable here, because it has some interesting things to offer, I think. Despite some flubs and flaws, I still continue like it, really. Certainly it falls just short of being considered a great album, but it's definitely a good one, not prog but good. So let's be fair and give it 3 stars.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Supertramp by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.47 | 340 ratings

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Supertramp
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N?361

Supertramp is a British progressive rock band formed in 1969 under the name of Daddy, before changing their name to Supertramp, in the early of 1970, inspired by a book of William Henry Davies, "The Autobiography Of A Super-Tramp". Sponsored by the Dutch millionaire Stanley August Miesegaes, vocalist and pianist Rick Davies put an ad in the Melody Maker looking for members for the band's line up, in 1969. Thus, Rick Davies saw join to him the vocalist and guitarist Roger Hodgson, the vocalist and guitarist Richard Palmer-James and the drummer and percussionist Robert Millar.

Thought their music was initially categorised as progressive rock, they have soon incorporated a combination of more traditional rock, art rock and pop into their music. The band's work is mainly marked by the great inventive song writing of Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies and the very distinctive and unique voice of Roger Hodgson. Supertramp soon would enjoy great critical and commercial success when they incorporated a more conventional musical approach with radio-friendly elements into their music, in the late of the 70's. Because of that, they became as one of the best known and most successful progressive bands, selling more than 60 million albums in the world, reaching their peak of commercial success with their sixth studio album "Breakfast In America", which has sold more than 20 million copies.

"Supertramp" is the debut eponymous studio album of Supertramp and was released in 1970. It was sometimes released under the name of "Now And Then". This is in general considered one of their albums that feature more progressive characteristics, in their entire musical career, having long instrumental passages and with an emphasis on the keyboards and guitars. "Supertramp" is also the only album of the band that includes the participation of Richard Palmer-James, as a band's member, who acts as a lyricist in addition to playing other musical instruments. Later he became the lyricist of King Crimson. Robert Millar also acts only on this album from the group, as a drummer, because he unfortunately suffered a mental breakdown and left the band shortly after the departure of Richard Palmer-James.

So, the line up on the album is Roger Hodgson (vocals, acoustic guitar, bass guitar, cello and flageolet), Rick Davies (vocals, organ, harmonica, piano and electric piano), Richard Palmer-James (vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar and balalaika) and Robert Millar (harmonica, drums and percussion).

"Supertramp" is quite a bit different than some of their later radio and AOR musical material. It's inundated with some instrumental meandering, with greater emphasis and attention granted to the keyboards and guitars than to the writing and to the overall effluence of the music. All music was written by Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies and all lyrics were written by Richard Palmer-James. The album is bookended by the two "Surely" musical pieces, which gives to it a kind of a conceptual air. Despite all the tracks are good, I really think that its the tenth track "Try Again" that deserves a very special mention. In the first place it's very rare to see a Supertramp's song with more than 10 minutes. In their entire musical career, only three songs have more than 10 minutes. Only "Brother Where You Bound" and "Fool's Overture" have that in common. In the second place "Try Again" represents the best musical moment on the album. It's basically a progressive ballad expanded to making of it a sort of a great epic track. It has really a great, moody and melancholic chorus based around some nice vocal harmonies specific of Roger Hodgson, and has an excellent screechy guitar solo, too. This is, in reality, a well made track but it also shows that the band needs some more time to develop their music. So, we can't expect of it the same quality level and the maturity of "Fool's Overture" or even of "Brother Where You Bound". But the rest of the tracks are all in general good. There are some attractive moments too, such as the mixture of ardour and subtlety that arises in "Words Unspoken", "Surely" and "Nothing To Show", there are some tasty emotional acoustic songs like "Home Again" and there are the decent rockers "It's A Long Road" and "Maybe I'm A Beggar". These songs are catchy with convincing riffs, good vocals, engaging lyrics and nice instrumental passages.

Conclusion: "Supertramp" represents a very different start from the band, so different that someone who doesn't know enough well the story of the beginning of the band doesn't recognize this album as a true album of Supertramp. It's very different from their next releases, because this is an album more in the vein of "Trespass" of Genesis or "The Aerosol Grey Machine" of Van Der Graaf Generator. "Supertramp" is strangely a very interesting and curious album, because and despite its simplicity and naivety, it's in general, an album much more progressive than some band's latter efforts. "Supertramp" is a good album, very well balanced and with a musical purity that no more could be present in any other album from them. Because of that, this is an album that reminds me, very often, "Trespass" of Genesis. Concluding, "Supertramp" is a very nice album for a debut album. Although it's far from being a great album because it has some weaknesses, but it's definitely better than some of the other studio albums made by them. 3,5 stars really.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Famous Last Words by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1982
3.20 | 337 ratings

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Famous Last Words
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Where_Nobody_knows

4 stars Supertramp's follow up to 1979's "Breakfast in America" paints a sonic portrait of a fractured whole. The band responsible for cracking the insulated egg of the US charts, striking gold with three massive hit songs, finds itself facing a crisis. The creative duo of Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson's already strained relationshipwas wearing increasingly thinner. The two living in different worlds both creatively and geographically, forced the band into three parts; Davies, Hodgson, and the band. Both Hodgson and Davies recoded their contributions seperate from eachother. It didn't help either, that the band had just completed a grueling tour consisting of 120 concerts in 9 months. Nevertheless, the road weary band would head to the studio to capitalize on their momentum. The result was "...famous last words..."

The album is simultaneously permiated with a melancholy mood, and a bittersweet optimism. Every song is of high quality, no doubt, and every song has something to say. Most importantly, each song is given room to breath. No two sound alike. It is the album's greatest strength, and also it's greatest weakness. The biggest problem is that the album doesn't have an overarching sound or a cohesive theme running through it. You don't really need either to have a great album, but it doesn't hurt. It has it's share of jarring moments. It jumps from a song about isolation and identity( Know who you are), to an upbeat love song (My kind of lady) at a brisk pace. This is mostly due to the two songwriting members of the band being isolated from one another both creatively and literally. It just feels a bit disjointed.

All in all, the production is superb. The songs are all well written. All the elments that make Supertramp great are there, and not there, all at once. Say what you will about the album, it has it's flaws. It is disjointed at times, grandiose at others. Unabashedly optimistic and introspective and moody. Yet, it is a well polished piece of work all around.

The highlights of the album are the opener, "Crazy", "Bonnie", "It's raining again", "My kind of lady" and "Ive been waiting so long". The rest of the album is great, just my personal choices of highlights.

 Crime of the Century by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.31 | 1660 ratings

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Crime of the Century
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by jamesbaldwin
Prog Reviewer

5 stars After the first two albums, often underestimated, and the dissolution, "Crime of the Century" presents us the classic Supertramp line-up, and songs that have made history.

Side 1 1. School (5:35). The opening song of the album features Davies' very poignant country harmonica, followed by Hodgson's voice, which can create problems for various listeners due to the high pitch and at times shrill. Then the piece has an almost syncopated rhythmic progression, in blues style, where Hodgson proves that he has learned to play the electric guitar well. Finally comes the jazz piano interlude, which sees Davies in great dusting, and then comes the fourth phase, the best, with the alternating voices of Davies and Hodgson, very convincing. In the end the blues piece returns with only Hodgson to successfully conclude this piece, in fact a mini-suite that best expresses the syncretic ability of the group - as well as their ability, taken by the Beatles, to create a refined song for arrangements and musical styles but very usable, very commercial, also suitable for supermarkets. Rating 8,5.

2. Bloody Well Right (4:26). The piece starts with a jazzy piano, very emphatic and winking, then Hodgson's hard- rock guitars arrive. When Davies starts singing, it seems almost heavy metal, for a few moments, but then the beatles-style pop choirs come to remind us that this is always happy and playful music, even when it wants to be bad, angry or dramatic. Finale with sax solo. Original song for Supertramp, which combines jazzy piano with almost heavy metal guitars. Simpering. Rating 7,5/8.

3. Hide In Your Shell (6:52). Melodic pop song in retro style, almost like a Broadway musical from the Fifties, daughter of the most cheerful and with choirs Beatles songs (It Wont Be Long or Hold Me Tight). Hodgson's voice is overpowering and shuffling and the choirs make it worthy of the Bee Gees and of the soundtracks that will be the setting for John Travolta's films. The three verses are almost melancholy, then in the choruses the song comes alive and Hodgson's high tones become shrill, and they may like it or not. But in the progression that reaches the chorus the song seems like the soundtrack of a Broadway musical. Rating 8.

4. Asylum (6:30). Davies' piano ballad that begins as a song by Elton John, flat, easy, without jolts, only that Davies' voice is not as clear and melodic as that of Elton John. Then the ballad warms up, the drums arrive, the electric guitar arrives, and also the string arrangements arrive, which weigh down the piece. There are also interludes for dialogue with Hodgson's falsetto voice. Production and sound are not working at their best, and the performance is also not perfect. Pleasant song, very pop, very theatrical musical for teenagers. In two words: overproduced and kitsch. Rating 7+.

Side 2 The beginning is marked by 5. Dreamer (3:19), short song, commercial, all shrill voice of Roger Hodgson and electric piano played percussively. Brilliant in its own way. Song in three phases: initial exalted piece, reflective piece in the middle, with Davies' voice to give a more baritone and cavernous tone, then return of the initial exalted piece, with greater emphasis and percussion. Repetitive text with phonetic rather than semantic value, aimed at amplifying the sound of music. Rating 7,5/8.

6. Rudy (7:07). In my opinion it is the masterpiece of the album. Excellent jazz piano beginning, Davies' voice accompanies a music suspended between jazz and boogie which gradually becomes more rock and roll, but always with very catchy sounds (guitars and keyboards). The hard rock guitars played by Hodgson are as tacky as those of Queen, and the atmosphere becomes emotionally intense only when the piano remains. Supertramp always struggle to have a "serious" sound, everything in them tends to become comics or musicals, but here they strive to give it a lot, and so comes a very pressing orchestral piece where the alternating voices of Hodgson and Davies give the best of self in being up to the dramatic tone, and perhaps their best vocal duet ever comes out, concluded in the final by Davies alone, finally intense and convincing. French sentimental film ending. Rating 8.5 / 9

7. If Everyone Was Listening (4:05). This is the only song on the album that has not become a classic of their discography and concerts. Initially we hear Hodgson, how strange !, singing on the low notes in what is a piano ballad, which soon goes upbeat, on the major key. It is the only song with a little catchy melody, but well arranged and all in all not very playful. It is certainly a true songwriting, almost a solo piece by Hodgson, where Helliwell's clarinet stands out and the arrangement of strings towards the end. It is one of the most serious songs on the disc, which continues the seriousness that began with Rudy and which ends with Crime. Rating 8.

8. Crime Of The Century (5:20). Final piece among the most epic of the group's discography. Almost dramatic beginning enshrined in Davies' voice, neutral (we are used to hearing it sarcastic and grotesque) which, however, does not touch true heights of pathos. Then an instrumental variation starts based on a piano motif that becomes more and more emphatic, up to paroxysm, thanks to the orchestration and the final arrival of the saxophone: at that point yes the music touches the dramatic, intense climax which it sought, worthy of a movie. Rating 8+

This is not prog. It's symphonic pop, heir to the Batles, with a touch of jazz, a touch of country and hard-rock, based on the melody, very easy listening, with vocal parts worthy of a Broadway musical. But the mix of this music is original, very usable, and certainly creative. It is syncretic music, with the ability to make commercial, accessible to all elements of various musical genres. The same qualities as the Beatles. Small masterpiece.

Medium quality of the songs: 8. Rating: 9. Five stars.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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